Hobbies in Recovery are Rewarding in Many Ways

John SniffenLa Hacienda

Jeremy Sosa with Playhouse 2000 cast of The Pretty Trap

Photo: Jeremy Sosa, second from left, with the cast and crew of Playhouse 2000’s production of The Pretty Trap. (Photo courtesy Playhouse 2000)

As with many people in recovery, Jeremy Sosa was looking for a hobby, something to keep him busy.

He’d done theater work as a youth, so the La Hacienda Business Development Specialist stopped by Kerrville’s community theater, Playhouse 2000, and volunteered to help.

They suggested that he audition for a production of Gilbert and Sullivan’s “The Mikado,” and he ended up in the chorus and has stayed active since.

Something to be Passionate About

Jeremy found working in the theater to be beneficial on multiple layers.

“It’s been a big part of my recovery; both because it’s given me a hobby to be passionate about, and it’s allowed me to become part of the greater Kerrville community and theatre across the state and country.”

“Theater allows you to answer essential questions: Who am I? Who is my community?” he adds.

Jeremy is not the only member of Playhouse 2000 in recovery.

The theater troupe is very friendly to Kerrville’s sizeable recovery community from which many of its members come, director and actor Amy Goodyear told the Kerrville Daily Times.

Overcoming Unhappiness

La Hacienda Recovery Community Director Chris Raymer agrees that involvement in an activity or hobby is key to recovery.

“I spent a whole bunch of years bouncing around the rooms, never staying sober for long. I sure wanted to and I dang sure needed too!” says Chris. “Ultimately, the unhappiness always seemed to outweigh the benefits of sobriety.”

With the support of his sponsor, therapists, and community, Chris started working and going to classes.

“I still went to a bunch of meetings and stayed focused on finishing those nasty amends. But it all made sense this time. I finally understood why I had gotten sober to begin with. I was loving life!”

Gettysburg Bound

This year Jeremy’s hobby took him and the Playhouse 2000 troupe to the finals of the American Association of Community Theater’s biennial AACTFest competition.

They rehearsed and performed a one-act play, The Pretty Trap, developed from the final act of Tennessee Williams’ The Glass Menagerie. Jeremy played the role of Jim Delaney, a gentleman caller invited to dinner so he could meet the hostess’ daughter.

By winning at area, state, and regional levels, the troupe advanced to the national competition in Gettysburg, PA, in June.

Playhouse 2000 did not win first place, but Jeremy came home with an excellence in acting award, repeating honors he also received at the state and regional levels of AACTFest.

Congratulations, Jeremy!